Tony Economou - RE/MAX Advantage I



Posted by Tony Economou on 11/3/2016

Dogs are known as man’s best friend. But man’s best friend requires work and money. A dog is a large responsibility and is more than just a pet. A dog will become a part of your family. Do you have what it takes to add another member to your family? Cost: The cost of a dog goes well beyond the initial adoption or breeder fee. It’s important that you consider the lifetime cost of owning a dog and whether or not you can afford one. And the cost could be drastically different between different types of breeds. There’s the cost of food, grooming, veterinary care, toys, etc. Larger breed dogs will eat more food therefore increasing the food cost. Or your dog could develop an allergy to certain foods, therefore needing special food that can be much more expensive than regular food. It’s also important that you save for emergency vet visits, as they can be completely unpredictable and very trying at the time. Having money saved up will take a small bit of the stress away. It may even be in your best interest to invest in pet insurance. It may save you down the road. Time: Dogs require a lot of work and a lot of attention. Before getting a dog seriously consider things like work hours, work traveling, your social life, taking care of your children and vacations. In addition, you should also consider that there are different breeds of dogs that require different levels of attention. And if you’re looking to get a puppy, be prepared to dedicate your time to him/her, especially for the first few months. It’s crucial that you are completely aware of the effort and time that goes into being a dog owner. Allergies: It’s imperative to know whether or not you or anyone living in your home has any allergies to dogs. And it’s best to know before you adopt or buy— there are tests that your doctor can run. It’s never a good situation for the dog owner(s) and animal if the dog has to either be given back or given to someone else due to an allergy. This will put a lot of stress on the dog going from home to home. It can also cause harm to the people involved, as it is always difficult letting go of a pet. If someone in the home has an allergy and you still want a dog then you will need to consider the breeds of dogs that are considered hypoallergenic. Adopting a dog may possibly be one of the best decisions that you make in life. They become your best friend and a part of your family. They will greet you when you come home, be your running partner and cuddle buddy. But, you are caring for another life and the adoption or purchase of a dog should be well thought out and something you are prepared for. Remember that you are the whole world to a dog so be sure you have the love and attention to give him/her.




Tags: dogs   pets   Getting a Pet   Dog Lovers   dog   adopted pet  
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Posted by Tony Economou on 10/20/2016

If you're a dog owner you know well that caring for a dog is like caring for a small child who stays a small child for their entire life. They're a lot of work, but dogs are a part of the family and anyone lucky enough to have a canine companion will tell you that they're more than worth the trouble. One difficulty many dog owners face is burn spots on their lawns. Most people assume that dogs are going to kill their grass one way or another and it's useless to try to prevent it. However, with some diligence and training you can prevent dead spots from taking over your lawn.

What is lawn burn?

Dog urine is very high in nitrogen. While a little bit of nitrogen is healthy for your soil and your grass, too much makes the soil extremely acidic which kills your lawn causing "burn" spots. If you've ever gardened before you might be familiar with the concept of soil's pH number. A pH number describes how acidic (0-6) or how basic (7-14) a substance is. Different types of plant life require different levels of acidity on the pH scale. When you buy fertilizer or plant food at the garden shop you're really buying a mixture of chemicals that alter your soil's pH. The ideal pH for growing healthy grass is 6.5-7, roughly midway on the pH scale.

What can be done?

Ok, so now you know the science behind why your dog doing his business kills your lawn. But what can you do about it? There are a number of different techniques that have been proven to be effective at mitigating or eliminating the damage caused by lawn burn.
  • Training. The most effective methods of preventing lawn burn is through proper training of your dog. Find a part of your yard that you ideally want to train your dog to do their business in. This part can be dirt, rocks, or an out of sight patch of lawn that you don't mind taking some damage. Lead them over to this area when it's time for them to go out and give them treats and verbal praise when they do their business in that area. If they start to urinate in another area, correct them by calling them over to the area they should be in. Don't punish them, as this will confuse dogs and they might not feel safe urinating outside at all.
  • Water down. An effective method of preventing burn spots is to simply saturate the area where the dog urinated with water immediately afterward. This will dilute the nitrogen from the urine and limit damage.
  • Healthy nutrition. Dog food is sometimes very high in protein which increases nitrogen in their urine. Pick a food that has healthy amounts of protein in it. Similarly, dehydrated dogs will have urine with a higher nitrogen level. Encourage your dog to drink plenty of water.

Myths about lawn burn

Many myths about dog-related lawn burn have appeared over the years. Some people argue that female dogs' urine burns a lawn more than males. This is untrue. If a female dog's urine does burn the lawn more it is simply because female dogs have a tendency to stay in one place while doing their business. Other myths include the usefulness of feeding your dog supplements to eliminate spots or that certain dog breeds have more acidic urine and cause more spotting. These are also misconceptions. The best options are to work together with your dog and make sure they are well-fed and hydrated. Soon your lawn will regrow to its former glory.




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Posted by Tony Economou on 10/6/2016

Tips For Training Your Puppy Rescuing a puppy in need of food, warmth, shelter, and love is a heart-motivated event. Inviting your new friend into your home, a joy-filled act of love and compassion that is often amongst a pet owner’s most cherished memories. Begin Basic Obedience Training Early The first few weeks of your puppy’s time in his new environment should be focused primarily on socializing and bonding. Begin basic training early. Be a leader and establish boundaries and a pup’s house training process. To avoid chewed up shoes and soiled carpets, note unwanted behavior with a stern “No” command and positive behavior with “Good Dog”, a tasty treat and loving praise. Be firm in voice and actions. Your dog senses your level of confidence and responses accordingly. It is a whole lot easier to teach your puppy how you want him to behave now than to try to correct bad habits later. While your puppy’s body is still growing, his brain is fully developed and ready to learn. Just remember puppies are young, curious, and have a short attention span becoming easily bored or distracted. Keep lesson times brief, but frequent throughout the day. A puppy is constantly learning; train early and train often. Make sure your dog learns positive lessons and not the wrong ones. Always be consistent with your commands. In all circumstances use the same primary words such as “come”, “sit”, “stay”, and “down”. These are the same commands you will use throughout your dog’s life. Whatever words you choose for these basic instructions does not matter, just be sure to always use the same command for each desired positive behavior. It is imperative that you can control your dog to ensure his/her safety. The best way to ensure that your new pet will become an obedient and pleasing companion is to train your pup well from the start. A well-socialized dog is relaxed, friendly, and at ease around new people and in new situations. During training, reward positive response to your command with a tasty treat, effusive praise, and physical affection. You are the “Alpha” leader and your dog wants to please. Puppy “Boot Camp” Look online or in the phone book to locate a local puppy “boot camp” program for early dog training. Interacting with other dogs is a great way for your puppy to learn to socialize and get over separation anxiety from his/her littermates. Ask Others For Help Seek help from other family members and friends. Enlist the help of older children in the training process so that they can learn along with the new addition to the family. The more people you can involve in your dog’s training, the better. You don’t want your dog to view you as the only individual whose commands he must obey. Having other people involved in your dog’s training is also helpful in keeping him from regressing in your absence. Special Training Treats Training treats should be small and highly flavorful with a strong scent. Professional trainers, often use dehydrated bites of chicken liver or salmon jerky nuggets. Find a special treat that your puppy especially enjoys and reserve it for training rewards only.




Tags: dogs   pets   puppy  
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Posted by Tony Economou on 7/7/2016

Moving to a new house means big changes for everyone involved, but for a dog, it can be an especially confusing time. While you can talk to a child ahead of time to explain to them what to expect we, unfortunately, do not have the same ability to communicate with our beloved pets about the big changes ahead. The good news is, there are a few things you can do to make the move a smoother process for both you and your dog. Ahead of time - if it's close enough, visit the new house with your dog prior to moving to familiarize them with the new environment and neighborhood. Also, pack your dog's belongings (toys, bowls, bed, food) together so you can be prepared to pull it out first when you arrive at the new house. During the move - consider having your dog stay with a friend or doggy daycare on moving day. This will save your dog from the stress of their surroundings changing during the move. You also won't need to worry about where your dog is while doors are being left open or if they are underfoot during the moving process. If moving over a distance - take frequent breaks to let your dog out to walk around and avoid feeding him right before the journey in case they are prone to car sickness. Talk to your dog in a calm voice throughout the moving process to comfort them, they can pick up on our emotions so trying to remain calm yourself will cue to your animal that everything is okay. Stay safe - before letting your dog loose into your new yard you will want to ensure that it is free of potentially poisonous plants they may try to eat and check for any holes in fences they may try to squeeze through. You will also want to update your dog's tag and/or microchip with your new address and phone number. Maintain structure - keep old bedding and toys to give your dog some familiarity in their new environment. If you are looking forward to replacing their bed, waiting until your dog is settled into the new house is ideal. Stick to regular routines that were in place before the move where possible. This includes things like walks, feedings, and times you are away from the house. Have fun - when you arrive, allow your dog to explore the new house and yard. Take them for a walk around the new neighborhood, play their favorite game with them and get them tired out so they will be more relaxed when it's time to settle in for the night at home. Bonding time - spend quality time with your dog to reassure them that moving to the new home is a positive experience. Try to spend the first few days after the move at home with your dog to spend time with them and monitor how they are adjusting. Moving can be an exciting process for both you and your dog with a little bit of preparation. Setting up ahead of time before your dog's arrival to the new home and spending quality time together not only makes for a smoother move in experience but also gives you the opportunity to strengthen the bond between you and your dog!




Tags: moving tips   Dog safety   dogs  
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